Film Reviews

Film Reviews

Welcome to FilmFestSalon! Read our reviews on domestic films, foreign films and the classics.

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News & Resources

News & Resources

Check out the latest on the Film Festival Circuit with breaking news from IndieWIRE.

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The Calendar

The Calendar

See the schedule of your favorite film festival so you can be a part of the excitement.

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Film: “Aniara”

Aniara,¬†an ambitious science fiction film from Sweden, takes enormous risks by imagining the end of the world – in fact of human civilization – from a realistic perspective. Written and directed by Pella Kagerman and Hugo Lilja, it was inspired by an epic poem by Nobel Laureate Harry Martinson, which was later turned into an…

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Film: “The Souvenir”

Joanna Hogg has directed and written an openly autobiographical film, “The Souvenir”, about her early career as a filmmaker. One reason it has received a lot of attention is because it stars Honor Swinton Byrne, who is Tilda Swinton’s daughter. One of Hogg’s first short films starred Swinton, who plays her daughter’s mother in this…

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Film: “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile”

    There were high expectations for this docudrama about serial killer Ted Bundy, which was based on the book, “The Phantom Prince”, written by Liz Kendall, the woman who lived with him for several years. As adapted by Michael Werwie, and directed by documentary filmmaker Joe Berlinger, it was given the awful title, Extremely…

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4 From Tribeca 2019

I’ll review the four films in the order in which I saw them. Luce Luce, directed by Julius Onah from a screenplay he co-adapted from a play with its author, J.C. Lee, is a challenging and provocative story concerning the black experience in America today. But it is a highly specialized experience. The title character…

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Film: “Long Day’s Journey Into Night”

Bi Gan’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night”, a peculiar but intermittently enjoyable Chinese film, has no connection to the Eugene O’Neill play other than the title. Bi Gan gave a brief introduction to the film because he realized, correctly I think, that the audience was likely to be frustrated because the “mystery” that the film’s…

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Two from New Directors/New Films

  I‘ve seen two films from this highly respected showcase for new talent. They make an interesting contrast. Yeo Siew Hua’s A Land Imagined is a fairly engrossing, mystifying film about modern-day Singapore. Hua’s vision is quirky, kind of all-over-the place, but he shows promise. The film opens at a major land reclamation project, where…

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Film: “The Mustang”

It’s always welcome to catch Matthias Schoenaerts in a film, and his latest, “The Mustang”, affords him one of his better roles. But, while his performance is often strong and charismatic, the film has story and execution problems that lessen the impact. Directed by Laure de Clermont-Tonnere, from a script by Mona Fastvold, Brock Norman…

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Film: “Climax”

After five features, it should be evident by now that the controversial French-Argentinian filmmaker, Gaspar Noe, is a rigid formalist. His latest, “Climax”, which was previewed at last year’s Cannes festival, is as formalized and anti-dramatic as any of his previous features. It presents sex and violence as irrevocably combined, resulting in destruction and guilt.…

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